Silent Campus Protest Speaks Volumes Across Texas State

By DaLyah Jones
News Reporter

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Texas State University students joined in a silent protest on Wednesday in response to the recent shooting of an unarmed African American man in San Diego, California on Tuesday.

Students staged a “die-in,” which involved sitting on the stairs in front of the Stallions Statue with their mouths taped and fists held high for about two hours. Russell Boyd II, a co-planner of the event, said that the sit in was planned in a matter of hours.

“When a community experiences so much back-to-back and we don’t have time to really cope, you do what you see necessary to ensure that you are standing as a united collective, or as a community,” Boyd said.

Boyd also said the protest was in response to the series of police brutality issues around the country. Danielle Brisby, Graduate student and protester, said that she hopes that protest like this one helps to encourage other students to stand with the Black Lives Matter movement.

“It’s beautiful to see  people of different races, creeds, nationalities or faith-base come together to for the support of humanity,” Brisby said. “It’s a beautiful cause and I love it.”

Russell Boyd II during the silent protest. Photo by DaLyah Jones.
Russell Boyd II during the silent protest. Photo by DaLyah Jones.

During the protest, students and faculty shared words of solace and their stories of overcoming oppression. This protest is one of the many events that have been organized in regards to social injustice. Last Saturday, during the Texas State football game against the University of Houston, students sat during the national anthem. Boyd said that Texas State has seen an increase in these protests and he hopes that it continues to grow.

“I hope that it will get to people who aren’t aware of their privilege or aren’t aware of black lives matter,” Boyd said. “It’s so sad that people of color have to validate themselves in a space that they too have a sense of ownership for.”

Texas State isn’t the only school seeing more protests around campus. Many other schools, like the University of Louisville and the University of North Carolina, have decided to join this movement. According to a study by the Washington Post, about 991 people were shot by police in 2015. It also found that about 40% of the unarmed fatalities were African American men.

4 thoughts on “Silent Campus Protest Speaks Volumes Across Texas State

  1. I’ve seen how the school has attempted to silence the women on this campus. From my understanding the Pan-Hellenic council has limits placed on it with how many students and when students can join a sorority. Personally I believe it’s a way for administrators to quell the student’s voice, and prevent any major stir which would result in major media outlets coming in and asking them questions. When you have hundreds if not 1000’s of students joining up in solidarity, campus administrators fear that things will get out of hand. They fear students may decide to seek out other universities, and even public universities have to operate like a private business: keep attendance up or lose money. They fear that somebody with a bigger voice may start asking what is going on and asking questions and seeking for answers, which the administrators don’t have or fear may make things worse as it will be viewed as a short sighted solution. When the university has done this to you, you’ve lost your First Amendment right to freedom of speech and the right of to peaceably assemble, and to petition the Government (your school) for a redress of grievances.

    As we’ve learned from prior demonstrations in making change, we need a clear set of goals, and a plan of action. That’s needed for achieving success in a mission and after the mission is achieved. Getting something changed is not just end of it. The change must be kept and it must be honored, and the change must be one that ensures the change stays as needed.

  2. I’ve seen how the school has attempted to silence the women on this campus. From my understanding the Pan-Hellenic council has limits placed on it with how many students and when students can join a sorority. Personally I believe it’s a way for administrators to quell the student’s voice, and prevent any major stir which would result in major media outlets coming in and asking them questions. When you have hundreds if not 1000’s of students joining up in solidarity, campus administrators fear that things will get out of hand. They fear students may decide to seek out other universities, and even public universities have to operate like a private business: keep attendance up or lose money. They fear that somebody with a bigger voice may start asking what is going on and asking questions and seeking for answers, which the administrators don’t have or fear may make things worse as it will be viewed as a short sighted solution. When the university has done this to you, you’ve lost your First Amendment right to freedom of speech and the right of to peaceably assemble, and to petition the Government (your school) for a redress of grievances.

    As we’ve learned from prior demonstrations in making change, we need a clear set of goals, and a plan of action. That’s needed for achieving success in a mission and after the mission is achieved. Getting something changed is not just end of it. The change must be kept and it must be honored, and the change must be one that ensures the change stays as needed.

  3. It waspeaceful until one of my friends had to go through the quad and since she couldn’t get around them to go to an exam she had, she got called out for trying to go through them. I am for students and all citizens expressing their feeling and showing what they believe in, but the not so nice words she received from some of these students in this did not seem appropriate. I respect y’all for standing up for these issues that have been happening, everyone has the right to. But the way some of these students got mad at her for trying to get to her exam did not seem appropriate.

  4. I believe in free speech. And I am glad to see people taking action. I just wish they did their research first. Planning a protest in “a matter of hours” is not a good way to really know all the facts of a case. I believe in protest. But protesting without due process is no better than the people they accuse.

Share Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s