B2SB: Mental Health at Texas State University

By Ally Bolender
Web Content Assistant Member

SAN MARCOS, Texas — Texas State University welcomes students back to campus this August 2020 for the fall semester. As students begin learning in online classrooms and restricted amenities due to the current pandemic.

Antonio Rincon, a member of the production department at KTSW, sat down to discuss mental health resources available for students at Texas State University. 

“A lot of students are coming into Texas State to find that campus is now mostly closed,” said Rincon. “Classes are going online, and with that, so are student services such as the counselling center.”

There are plenty of campus and San Marcos mental health resources available for students.

The Texas State University counseling center is still open for routine appointments by appointment only. The center will also be providing urgent and crisis support in-person. For more information about meeting someone, please call 512-245-2208 (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

During the COVID-19 period, meetings through the phone or Zoom will be the most frequently used method for counseling.

TAO therapy is an online, self-service therapy assistance resources for Texas State students. The mobile friendly program includes educational videos and skill building exercises with a 24/7 availability. You can sign up for this service with your Texas State student login. 

Check out the KTSW blog for more information about Texas State University mental health resources. 

Due to the coronavirus, we must limit our interactions with people. But unfortunately, meeting new people is a valuable part of the freshman college experience. 

In order to help keep connected with friends, join any of the hundreds of organizations that Texas State University offers. Although many of them may conduct meetings online, it will still provide an opportunity to meet like-minded students.

With most classes moving to online lessons, it may be unusual to adjust to at first. But it is important for students to remember that we are all going through this unprecedented time together and it is a difficult transition for everyone— you are not alone.

“Being on your computer is taxing to student minds,” said Rincon. “Spending hours on your computer watching lectures and studying can really take a toll on you.”

It’s important that you don’t stretch yourself out too thin. Take breaks and mental health days when you need to. Also, be prepared to spend a lot of time looking at screens. Be sure you aren’t checking your phone as soon as you wake up. Give yourself some time to adjust before you dive into your schoolwork. 

Be sure to check on your friends, family, roommates and colleagues as we enter school during a pandemic. 

And lastly, remember that mental and physical health should always come before academics. You can do this, Bobcats!

For the full conversation about mental health (and even more interviews), listen to KTSW’s Back to School Broadcast on August 16-19.

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